Don't fall for another diamond scam

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Trying to keep from falling prey to any of the myriad diamond scams can be tricky – even for those who think they are well-educated in gemstones. While from time to time, there are reports of significant scams in the trade of diamonds, the majority of such scams are relatively minor. They usually occur as a result of a diamond buyer not knowing much about diamonds.

Here are a few elements of real diamonds:

  • Diamonds have much lower refractive indexes.
  • Diamonds throws off flashes of color and sparkle white.
  • Diamonds have high density, and they sink in water.
  • Diamonds are unresponsive to high heat because they are made of incredibly durable material.
  • Most diamonds will emit a blue-colored glow under a UV light.

Here are a few diamond scams and how to avoid them.

Glitz and glamour

Most jewellery shops display diamonds under bright lights. The trick is to make the diamond sparkle under the lights. Another jewelers may engage in is to vary the degrees through fluorescent lights. They also scam people by referring to a rock as a blue-white diamond in order to create the illusion of an exceptional, unique gem to their ignorant costumers.

The best way to avoid these scams – though some of them are just bad business – is to take the diamond to a different, darker type of lighting, where its actual color will be revealed. Also, it is essential to understand that a blue-white diamond is actually of lesser quality.

How much do you weigh

Not many people know about carat total weight, even though it is a significant scam many jewellery stores utilize. The trick is to list the total weight of all jewellery, rings especially, in the utility piece instead of a separate listing of the total weight of each diamond. Consumers are then led to believe that the real rock in the section is bigger than it actually is.

The best practice here is to inquire regarding the total carat weight of the center stone prior to every purchase. Another way to mitigate this scam is to be cautious of fractions. Jewellery stores are able to round off the weight of the diamond. For example, a three-quarters carat diamond may end up being between a half carat and three-quarters – but just slightly closer to three quarters.

Know your worth

Many diamond sellers have been a target of low balling. This kind of scam is done by deceitful jewelers when they are sought after for appraisal of diamonds that were bought elsewhere or given to them as gifts. Their means of getting the jewellery from the owner are in their opinion that it is worth less than it is worth or that it is virtually worthless. These jewelers propose to trade it for a supposedly much better diamond along with cash to make up the difference.

It is advisable to get a second or perhaps third opinion before taking any action. Apart from that, some tools can help you determine the value of your gems before selling them. Getting a professional certification also gives a peace of mind. Lastly, shopping around can mean you will get closer to the actual value of them gem.

Second diamonds are ever smaller

Jewelers even scam people by switching the specific crystal a customer has chosen. This is done when people leave a diamond ring to be sized or to be set in a piece of jewellery. Eventually, the ignorant individual ends up paying for a lesser value and quality. Many people have reported being scammed by jewelers swapping a diamond for a stone of lesser quality.

Engage a trustworthy jeweler when buying a diamond. It is advisable for people to avoid jewelers they have not done business with in the past. Moreover, it is important to stay vigilant. Since appraisals can take a lot of time, people must know their gems inside out. Many jewellery stores continuously scam unsuspecting consumers. The best way to go about buying or selling diamonds is to use the utmost consideration and care.

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